Five Tips for Staying at Dog Friendly Campsites

By January 12, 2017

So you want to take your dog with you on your next camping trip?  Well, who wouldn’t?  There can’t be many things better than sharing an outdoor adventure with your loyal four legged friends.  But there are a few things you need to consider before you set off; not the least of which is, will your dog be welcome at the campsite?

Not all sites allow dogs so, when planning your trip, this needs to be taken into account.  You can find dog-friendly campsites right here at  We have a global database of campsites which you can search and use to plan the perfect ‘canine and me’ camping trip. If you are wanting to take your dog away with you check out our dog-friendly camping articles.

To help you and your dog get the most out of your holiday here are our top five tips on getting the most out of staying at a dog-friendly site.

1     Keep your dog on its lead

This may come as a surprise, but not everyone loves dogs.  I know.  Crazy, right?  Nevertheless, even when you are camping on a dog-friendly site, you need to be mindful that some of your fellow campers may not be fully enamoured of a pooch running around and sticking its inquisitive nose into places where it’s not wanted.

So, the first tip, rule, recommendation, call it what you will, is to always keep your dog on a lead and under control.  In fact most, if not all, campsites insist on this.  Even the most dog-friendly of places.  So keep your dog close.

2     Don’t get lost

Even the best behaved and a home loving dog can run off especially when in a new and exciting environment.  Don’t run the risk of losing your dog if you get separated either on the campsite or whilst out hiking.

Make sure the dog is microchipped and registered so he can be retrieved if found.  For a more immediate solution, and one which owners of dogs with severe wanderlust should consider is to fit the little guy with a GPS tracker collar.  In an emergency, this can help you track down your dog quickly.  If GPS isn’t an affordable option an old fashioned bell on the collar can help in maintaining contact should an excitable pet run off?

3     Be prepared

You know how it is.  No matter how much you prepare and plan you always forget something when going on holiday.  But you can’t let that happen if you’re taking your dog away with you.  So, as he can’t pack his own bag, the responsibility is yours.  Make a checklist of everything he needs and make sure you take all the essentials.  Don’t forget:

  • Pack his food. He needs his regular food and stores local to the campsite, assuming there are any, may not stock the right brand
  • Favourite toy. If your dog has a special toy doesn’t leave it behind. It will be a secure and reassuring presence for him when staying in a strange place
  • Take a spare lead. Just in case
  • Consider having an extra set of tags made with the campsites name, address, and contact number as a safeguard should he wander off
  • Make a note of the contact numbers for the local vet in case of emergency

4     Respect the campsite rules

Each campsite will be different in what they allow and what they expect from dog owners.  Many will demand to see current vaccination certificates so remember to take any paperwork with you.  Be especially vigilant in clearing up after your dog both inside and outside the site environs; nothing alienates other campers more than not picking up after a dog.  Never leave your dog unattended as he may start barking and disturb other campers.

5     The most important tip of all; Have a great time on your hikes

No doubt when initially choosing your campsite you will have scoped out the surrounding area for hiking trails.  If your dog loves the outdoors he will have a great time romping around and exploring a new country.  But do make sure he is up to it and tailor his exercise, especially if he is getting on in years.  For more mature dogs it is worthwhile taking him to the vet for a checkup prior to making the trip, just to make sure it won’t be too much for him.

Do take care to check the local rules when out hiking.  National parks and scenic walkways may have a policy of only allowing dogs if they are kept on a lead.  Obey the regulations no matter how tempting it may be to see your dog running free through the countryside.

No matter how far you going on your hike ensure you have plenty of fresh drinking water both for yourself and your four-legged companions.  A foldable water bowl is a great piece of kit to take with you.

But no matter where you are, or where you want to go, remember you can use the search engine on this site to discover the best dog-friendly campsites.  Give yourself and your dog a camping trip you both will never forget.

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